Australian Navy apprentices geared for AWD destroyer operation

NUSHIP Hobart conducts sea trials in the Gulf St Vincent off the coast of Adelaide South Australia. Photo: Royal Australian Navy

The Royal Australian Navy is preparing its apprentices for the operation of new Hobart-class air warfare destroyers by having them work directly with industry in Adelaide, building on their initial trade training.

The Air Warfare Destroyer Alliance shipyard has provided a hand-on training environment for the sailors as part of the team building the navy’s new destroyers.

Developing and strengthening their skills to complete the final elements of their trade qualifications, 11 apprentices are working in the shipyard, with another nine possible positions to be filled in the future.

On joining the Alliance, the apprentices complete a rotation through the shipyard where they are assigned to their relevant trade groups including electrical, mechanical, refrigeration and welding.

This rotation allows the apprentices to gain experience in the different aspects associated with their trade group.

The electrical department currently has four navy apprentices working within their team, two in production and two in test and activation.

The navy said that five apprentices who were the first to commence with the Alliance in October last year are excelling at their shipyard rotation and are already close to completing the elements required for their trade qualification – almost six months earlier than expected.

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