USS Zumwalt departs for weapons testing, new homeport

The U.S. Navy has shared a video of its newest and most technologically advanced surface ship, future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departing the Bath Iron Works shipyard on September 7 to begin a 3-month journey to its new homeport in San Diego.

Crewed by 147 Sailors, Zumwalt is the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers designed to strengthen naval power. They are capable of performing critical maritime missions and enhance the Navy’s ability to provide deterrence, power projection and sea control.

After commissioning in Baltimore, Maryland, on October 15, the ship will sail to its homeport in San Diego, California. Soon after arriving, DDG-1000 will enter a post-delivery industrial availability and mission systems activation period to ready this stealth destroyer for operational testing and its maiden deployment. The Zumwalt is expected to be integrated into the fleet by 2018.

DDG 1000 will be the first U.S. Navy combatant surface ship to utilize an integrated power system (IPS) to provide electric power for propulsion and ship services. The IPS generates approximately 78 megawatts of power, nearly what a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier generates, to meet the total ship electric power requirements and provide extra capacity to accommodate future weapons and computing systems.

In preparation for Zumwalt’s departure from Bath, the crew recently completed an engineering light off assessment and crew certification to ensure the ship’s readiness to join the surface fleet.

“The 147 Sailors of Zumwalt (DDG 1000) have completed the training and certifications required of them in record time. They have demonstrated superb technical expertise, teamwork, and toughness over the last three months,” said Capt. James A. Kirk, Zumwalt’s commanding officer.

In addition to its advanced weapon and propulsion systems, Zumwalt is much larger than today’s destroyers. At 610 feet long and 80.7 feet wide, Zumwalt is 100 feet longer and 13 feet wider, and its flight deck is 93 percent larger than an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer.

Named for Adm. Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt Jr., former chief of naval operations (CNO) from 1970 to 1974, the Zumwalt-class features a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, a wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design and the latest war fighting technology and weaponry available.

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