Two US Navy subs return to their homeports

Two Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine, USS Cheyenne and USS Montpelier returned to their homeports February 5, completing their deployments to the Western Pacific and European waters, respectively.

Cheyenne achieved a number of milestones while under way, including participation in anti-submarine warfare exercises with Submarine Group 7, a port visit to Subic Bay in the Philippines, participating in volunteer work at a school for physically-challenged children, and organizing a beach clean-up.

While deployed with Cheyenne, 15 Sailors and four officers earned their designation as qualified in submarines and now wear the dolphin warfare insignia. Additionally, eight Sailors were advanced in rank, three officers were promoted, and 14 junior Sailors reenlisted while underway.

Homeported in Pearl Harbor, USS Cheyenne is named after the city of Cheyenne, Wyoming, and was the last of the 62 Los Angeles-class submarines to enter service in the U.S. Navy. Commissioned Sept. 13, 1996, Cheyenne measures more than 360-feet long and weighs more than 6,000 tons when submerged.

In 2003, Cheyenne earned the distinction of “first to strike” as the first ship to launch Tomahawk cruise missiles in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Since then, the submariners aboard have modified the original “Live the Legend” motto to “Ride the Legend,” representative of the warrior spirit of the crew and the pride they take in their mission and namesake city.

When it comes to the crew of USS Montpelier, 18 members earned their warfare qualifications. They also had 15 promoted to the next pay grade.

Montpelier is the third ship in the U.S. Navy to be named for the city of Montpelier, Vermont. Built by the Newport News Shipbuilding Company and Drydock Company, the “Mighty Monty” was commissioned March 13, 1993. The submarine has a crew complement of 15 officers and 129 enlisted. It is homeported in Naval Station Norfolk.

 

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