Canadian Navy Ships Conclude Op Caribbe 2015

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships Brandon and Whitehorse recently concluded their participation in Operation Caribbe 2015, a Canadian organized operation aimed at contributing to the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

Since leaving their home port of Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt on October 23, the Royal Canadian Navy ships assisted the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) in the seizure and disruption of approximately 9 800 kg of cocaine in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Central and South America.

The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) have conducted Operation CARIBBE since November 2006 and worked with both Western Hemisphere and European partners to address security challenges in the region.

Lieutenant-Commander Landon Creasy, Commanding Officer, HMCS Brandon, said: “The collaborative effort between both ships and the United States Coast Guard ensures the continued success of these types of operations in the region. I could not be more proud of the professionalism, communication and skillset of all the members involved in these disruptions.”

According to the Canadian Forces’ media statement, a total of seven disruptions were accomplished during the deployment resulting in approximately 9 800 kg of cocaine being seized or disrupted.

HMC Ships Brandon and Whitehorse, each with a U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment aboard, worked jointly on four of the seven cases.

HMCS Brandon is credited with two additional interdictions, and HMCS Whitehorse with one, during the deployment.

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