First Steel Cut for Royal Navy’s Third Patrol Vessel

Construction of the final Royal Navy Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) took an important step forward today, as the Minister of State for Defence Procurement started a computer-guided laser to cut the first piece of hull.

During a visit to BAE Systems’ Govan yard in Glasgow, Defence Minister Philip Dunne saw progress on the build of the first and second OPVs and met members of the workforce on a programme that has protected more than 800 Scottish jobs.

HMS Trent is the third of three Offshore Patrol Vessels which will begin joining the fleet in 2017. Alongside HMS Forth and HMS Medway, HMS Trent will go on to take part in counter terrorism, combating piracy, halting smuggling and defending UK waters.

The vessels are being built at BAE Systems’ shipyards on the Clyde as part of a £348 million contract.

This third generation of River-class patrol ship is expected to displace approximately 1,800 tonnes, be about 90m long and 13m wide and have a range of over 5,000 nautical miles.

Construction of the first two ships, HMS Forth and HMS Medway, is already well underway.

Image: BAE Systems Maritime

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