USNS Trenton Joins US Navy’s Fleet

The US Navy accepted delivery of the USNS Trenton (JHSV 5), its fifth joint high speed vessel, April 13.

Having completed acceptance trials only a month ago, the ship continues to meet key milestones as it progresses towards operational status. Now delivered to the Navy, the ship’s crew will begin move-aboard and familiarization before the ship sails away from the shipyard to begin her shakedown period and final contract trials later this year.

The first two ships of the class, USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) and USNS Choctaw County (JHSV 2) have already demonstrated their inherent flexibility participating in international exercises and missions.

Strategic and Theater Sealift Program Manager Capt. Henry Stevens, said:

What really sets these vessels apart is their speed, agility and transport capability. Trenton can travel thousands of miles without refueling and has over 20,000 feet of stowage space in her mission bay for everything from vehicles and military cargo to humanitarian supplies. That means we can equip our troops and allies with mission essential supplies faster than ever before.

 

USNS Trenton will be owned and operated by Military Sealift Command (MSC) and will be manned by a crew of 22 civil service mariners. The vessel is the fifth JHSV built by Austal at its shipyard in Mobile, Alabama, under a 10 ship, US$1.6 billion contract. Austal will deliver a further five Joint High Speed Vessels from its shipyard at Mobile, Alabama, with three currently under construction. USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) will soon be followed by Brunswick (JHSV 6) which Austal will launch this Spring and deliver later this year. Fabrication is well underway on Carson City (JHSV 7) and the first aluminum was cut earlier this year for Yuma (JHSV 8).

Image: Austal

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