USNS Fall River Ends Trials in Gulf of Mexico

The US Navy’s fourth Joint High Speed Vessel, USNS Fall River (JHSV 4) completed Acceptance Trials testing and evaluations in the Gulf of Mexico on July 25.

 

The ship’s trials included dockside testing to clear the ship for sea and rigorous at-sea trials during which the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) evaluated and demonstrated the performance of JHSV 4’s major systems.

“Each ship of this class leverages lessons learned from previously delivered vessels,” said Strategic and Theater Sealift Program Manager Capt. Henry Stevens. “JHSV 4 is no exception – and completion of these trials is a testament to the program’s stability and maturity, as well as the dedicated government/industry team that has been integral to its success.”

USNS Fall River is a high-speed, shallow-draft surface vessel built using a commercial design with limited modifications for military use including a versatile off-load ramp and flight deck for helicopter operations. The vessel’s unique characteristics will help enable the fast, intra-theater transport of troops, military vehicles and equipment access across the world including to austere piers and quays. The vessel will further enhance port access and operations in littoral areas including maneuver and sustainment, as well humanitarian and relief operations. JHSV 4 will be capable of transporting 600 short tons 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots.

JHSV 4 will now prepare for delivery to the Navy’s Military Sealift Command later this year. Following delivery and Final Contract Trials (FCT), USNS Fall River will join the sister ships of her class in support of operations around the world.

Press Release, August 04, 2014; Image: NAVSEA

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